BUTOH DANCE WORKSHOP

What: Butoh Dance Workshop
When: Saturday, November 21, 1:00 – 4:00
Where: Bryson Gym, Warren Wilson College
Who: Taught by Julie Becton Gillum
Cost: $30.00
Contact: Julie Becton Gillum, email: [email protected],
Telephone: (828)683-1377
“Create the form and the soul will follow.” Tatsumi Hijikata (founder of
butoh)
“Follow your heart and the form will reveal itself.” Kazuo Ohno (founder
of butoh)
Butoh History: Originating in post WWII Japan, Butoh dance is a postmodern movement in which
formal dance technique is eschewed in favor of primal and idiosyncratic styles that transform the human
body and allow raw physical energy to come into being. Butoh has revolutionized what dance is and can
be. It ‘s influence on today’s dance world equals that of Martha Graham or Merce Cunningham. Butoh is
an attempt to create new forms of movement and expression. Butoh uses the body brazenly, in its most
corporal state, as a battleground to attain personal, social, or political transformation. It searches for the
dance that pushes buttons, steps on toes and slips between the cracks of definition in order to reveal the
fervent beauty of the unique human spirit.
Biography of Julie Becton Gillum: Julie Gillum has been creating, performing and teaching dance in
the US and internationally for over 40 years. She currently teaches modern dance, musical theatre,
performance art and butoh at Warren Wilson College. Gillum’s primary form of artistic expression has
become butoh, which she has been practicing, performing and teaching since 1997. She has created and
presented major pieces in the genre, at a variety of venues in New York, Chicago, San Francisco
and Mexico. Gillum was awarded the 2008-09 NC Choreography Fellowship and used the funds to go
to Japan this past summer to study butoh at the source.
During her three month stay in Japan, Gillum studied primarily with Yoshito Ohno, son of Kazuo Ohno.
She also studied extensively with Natsu Nakajima, a disciple of Hijikata during the early days of butoh.
In addition she took weekly classes with Seisaku, who danced with Yoko Ashikawa, Hijikata’s first
female dancer. Gillum also took intensive workshops and performed with internationally renowned
butoh companies, Dairakudakan and Sankai Juku. The November workshop will delve into new material
learned in Japan this past summer.What: Butoh Dance Workshop
When: Saturday, November 21, 1:00 – 4:00
Where: Bryson Gym, Warren Wilson College
Who: Taught by Julie Becton Gillum
Cost: $30.00
Contact: Julie Becton Gillum, email: [email protected],
Telephone: (828)683-1377
“Create the form and the soul will follow.” Tatsumi Hijikata (founder of
butoh)
“Follow your heart and the form will reveal itself.” Kazuo Ohno (founder
of butoh)
Butoh History: Originating in post WWII Japan, Butoh dance is a postmodern movement in which
formal dance technique is eschewed in favor of primal and idiosyncratic styles that transform the human
body and allow raw physical energy to come into being. Butoh has revolutionized what dance is and can
be. It ‘s influence on today’s dance world equals that of Martha Graham or Merce Cunningham. Butoh is
an attempt to create new forms of movement and expression. Butoh uses the body brazenly, in its most
corporal state, as a battleground to attain personal, social, or political transformation. It searches for the
dance that pushes buttons, steps on toes and slips between the cracks of definition in order to reveal the
fervent beauty of the unique human spirit.
Biography of Julie Becton Gillum: Julie Gillum has been creating, performing and teaching dance in
the US and internationally for over 40 years. She currently teaches modern dance, musical theatre,
performance art and butoh at Warren Wilson College. Gillum’s primary form of artistic expression has
become butoh, which she has been practicing, performing and teaching since 1997. She has created and
presented major pieces in the genre, at a variety of venues in New York, Chicago, San Francisco
and Mexico. Gillum was awarded the 2008-09 NC Choreography Fellowship and used the funds to go
to Japan this past summer to study butoh at the source.
During her three month stay in Japan, Gillum studied primarily with Yoshito Ohno, son of Kazuo Ohno.
She also studied extensively with Natsu Nakajima, a disciple of Hijikata during the early days of butoh.
In addition she took weekly classes with Seisaku, who danced with Yoko Ashikawa, Hijikata’s first
female dancer. Gillum also took intensive workshops and performed with internationally renowned
butoh companies, Dairakudakan and Sankai Juku. The November workshop will delve into new material

learned in Japan this past summer.

Here is the info about my upcoming workshop. Please let your friends know about this opportunity and feel free to contact me with any questions you have. Hope you can come!

What: Butoh Dance Workshop
When: Saturday, November 21, 1:00 – 4:00
Where: Bryson Gym, Warren Wilson College
Who: Taught by Julie Becton Gillum
Cost: $30.00 (FREE FOR WWC STUDENTS)
Contact: Julie Becton Gillum, email: [email protected]
Telephone: (828)683-1377

“Create the form and the soul will follow.” Tatsumi Hijikata (founder of butoh)

“Follow your heart and the form will reveal itself.” Kazuo Ohno (founder of butoh)

Continue reading “BUTOH DANCE WORKSHOP”

Last Week in Japan

This is officially my last week in Japan. When I first arrived this seemed like a very foreign place. Now that I have been here for a while and contemplating a return to the good ole US of A, Japan feel like home and the US seems like some alien world full of ghosts and strangers.

I hope that is not the case! I really do look forward to getting back to being an artist and disseminating the inspiration I have received here. I feel like a sponge that has soaked up all it can and needs to be wrung out.  Well not really wrung out just squeezed gently!

I have gained so much from this experience. The workshops, classes and performances have been at the core, and through the butoh connection I have met fascinating new friends, been inspired by brilliant teachers, luxuriated in exquisite performance and even had time to enjoy a few amazing sights along the way.

I feel I have only touched the surface of the butoh opportunities that are here — I am just now getting into the loop of finding out about performances, classes and workshops. So many teachers, performers and artists struggling to survive and even succeed.  Butoh is alive and well in Japan; it just lives underground, on the fringe, along the edges, beneath the suface where you have to dig to find it. I am glad I brought my shovel, but mostly I used my hands and feet. My fingernails are pretty dirty from the effort but I will use that grime as fodder for new growth in my home community and beyond.

I visited with Kazuo Ohno again last night. My friend Nathan left a bouquet of lillies on Kazuo’s chest when we left. This beautiful image made me cry. He was so peaceful last evening, not like the last time — Yoshito was with us and seemed to stir him up. Kazuo was singing and dancing — in his way, with the feeding tube in his nose, his beautiful hands drawn up to his chest, his glowing skin vibrating with love and life — what dance is he doing now?

Sankai Juku Workshop

Sankai Juku is known for their visually stunning, ritualistic movement style, sensually performed by only men. The workshop was taught by director Semimaru, who was the original member of the company whose work is choreographed by Amagatsu. Members of the company took class with us and performed with us during the final performance at the end of the week.

During this workshop I learned a lot about the Noguchi Taiso method of body conditioning which is used by many butoh teachers. This method defines the body as a skin bag filled with water in which float the bones, muscles and organs. Movements involve shaking, waving, floating. Spinal alignment, a central axis, relaxed shoulders, and hanging from a string are basic to Noguchi Taiso. Semimaru also uses the ideas of tension /relaxation, center of gravity, vertical /horizontal, breathing, and rhythm in this work. These exercises felt so good to my body. I plan to continue them to keep me loose and strong.

The movement material we performed was not particularly interesting and used the same quality (soft, slow, wavy) throughout.

I did not feel a strong connection with Semimaru who is not particularly warm or friendly. I felt he just wanted us to pay our money, not make too much trouble and then go quietly away.

Kyogen Workshop

I took a 10-day workshop in Kyogen, the 700-year-old comedy form of Noh theatre taught by 8 different Kyogen actors, including Manzo Nomura IX, who is a Living National Treasure.  The form blends ancient techniques of Chinese and Japanese theatre. There is no book for teaching Noh and Kyogen. It is handed down by experienced actors and learned through imitation. Children begin learning at 3 or 4 in a 5-minute lesson. Each day 2 minutes are added to the lesson. The first role given to a child is that of a monkey. The role is quite a difficult one because the player must wear a mask which limits breathing and visibility.  During one of our sessions we put on the masks and moved around on the stage which proved to be quite challenging. The wearing of masks in Nom and Kyogen symbolizes the embodiment of the gods.

Continue reading “Kyogen Workshop”

Dairakudakan Workshop

Hakuba mountains, photo by jbgThe Dairakudakan workshop took place in Hakuba in northern Honshu where the ’97 Olympic skiing took place. The scenery was stunning as you can see from the photo taken from the front of our hostel.

The first 4 days of the workshop were interesting and physically challenging. We worked from 8 til noon, 2 – 5, 7:30 – 9:30. The rest of the time we were cleaning the hostel, cooking or grabbing a desperately needed nap. Morning and afternoon sessions were with company members learning and experimenting with new movement material. Evening sessions were with Akaji Maru, part movement exploration and part lectures about his philosophy of butoh dance.

Continue reading “Dairakudakan Workshop”

Kyoto Sightseeing

Yes Virginia, it's another gorgeous garden in Kyoto, photo by jbgIf Tokyo is the beating heart of Japan then Kyoto is the soul. It is lush green gardens, serene temples and shrines and a much slower paced life style. My two favorite places were Ryoangi zen garden and Sanjusangendo temple. Ryoangi is a world heritage site, a sand garden with 15 perfectly placed stones. It reminds me of the ocean with islands rising up from the depths.  The groupings of stones suggest varied images unique to each viewer. The wall that surrounds the garden is an object of meditation in itself. The surface of oiled stucco projects ghost-like visions.  Just sitting, this lovely garden washing over me, I felt the presence of another time and place — “Ma”.

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Kamakura

 

On Monday July 20, I went to Kamakura, which was the capital city of Japan between 1192 and 1333. It is a religious hub with 65 Buddhist temples and 19 Shinto shrines. We hiked from temple to shrine and saw many but not all of them. Ginger and I were guided by our new friend Hiromi who is charming and lots of fun. Continue reading “Kamakura”

Workshops and Classes

So far I have taken most of my classes with Yoshito Ohno and Natsu Nakajima. By meeting people in these workshops, I have found out about other classes and performances around Tokyo.  Even though I get most of my information via translations from bilingual students, I feel I am gaining some valuable information that I can work on for years. But I am sure much is lost because of the language barrier. Continue reading “Workshops and Classes”