Archive for the Category Classes

 
 

9TH ASHEVILLE BUTOH FESTIVAL features NYC’S BUTOH STAR “VANGELINE”


Vangeline Theater- Yi Chun Wu

TIME OUT CHICAGO
“BEST DANCE VISITS 2011″-

NEW YORK TIMES
“CAPTIVATING”

LOS ANGELES TIMES
“VANGELINE MOVES WITH THE CLOCKWORK DELIBERATION OF A PRACTICED JAPANESE BUTOH ARTIST”

JAPANCULTURENYC.ORG
“A TRIUMPH”

***

LEGACY BUTOH & ASHEVILLE CONTEMPORARY DANCE THEATRE To Present:
“WOMEN OF BUTOH”
9th Annual Asheville Butoh Festival

Legacy Butoh, in partnership with the Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre, will present the 9th Annual Asheville Butoh Festival on Thursday, September 18 through Monday, September 22 at the BeBe Theatre in downtown Asheville.
The Festival, under the artistic direction of Julie Becton Gillum, will feature internationally renowned butoh choreographer and dancer Vangeline, along with solo works by Asheville dancers Jenni Cockrell, Susan Collard, Amy Hamilton, Megan Ransmeir, and Julia Taylor. Ticketed performances and workshops open to dancers of all skill levels will be offered.

“We’re so fortunate to have Vangeline as the featured artist in the Asheville Butoh Festival this year,” said Julie Gillum. “Vangeline believes that Butoh can be a vehicle for collective and individual transformation in the 21st century, and I’m eager for her to share her artistic vision, her extraordinary choreographic skills, and her mesmerizing performances, with Asheville dancers and audiences.”

The unique art of butoh originated in post-World War II Japan as a reaction to the loss of identity caused by the westernization of Japanese culture, as well as a realization that ancient Japanese performing traditions no longer spoke to a contemporary audience. One of the major developments in contemporary dance in the latter half of the 20th century, butoh combines dance, theater, improvisation and influences of Japanese traditional performing arts to create a unique performing art form that is both controversial and universal in its expression.

***

Photography by Michael Blase

Photography by Michael Blase

3 WORKSHOP DISCOUNT – $75 – If you sign up for all 3 workshops by September 15!

9th Annual Asheville Butoh Festival Schedule of Events:

***All events take place at the BeBe theatre, 20 commerce street, Asheville
Thursday, September 18
8:00 PM “WOMEN OF BUTOH”
$17 in advance; $20 at the door; Senior $12, Student $10

***

Friday, September 19
8:00 PM “WOMEN OF BUTOH”
$17 in advance; $20 at the door; Senior $12, Student $10

***

Saturday, September 20
11 AM – 2 PM Butoh Workshop with Vangeline
$30

8:00 PM “WOMEN OF BUTOH”
BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street, Asheville
$17 in advance; $20 at the door; Senior $12, Student $10

***

Sunday, September 21
11 AM – 2 PM Butoh Workshop with Vangeline
BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street, Asheville, $30

7:00 PM “WOMEN OF BUTOH”
BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street, Asheville
$17 in advance; $20 at the door; Senior $12, Student $10

***

Monday, September 22
6 – 9 PM Butoh Workshop with Vangeline
BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street, Asheville, $30

***

Advance and door tickets for all Festival performances and workshops may be purchased in person at the BeBe Theatre, located at 20 Commerce Street in downtown Asheville, or by calling the box office at 828-254-2621.

For updated information on the Festival schedule and artists, visit www.ashevillebutoh.com. For ticket information and box office hours, visit www.acdt.org or call 828-254-2621.

***

Photography by Michael Blase

Photography by Michael Blase

Butoh Dance Workshop with Vangeline

“Butoh can lead us back to our rebellions, our private wars, our wounded selves, and through this process brings what is hidden into the light. “The process is deeply healing and transformative. Shedding various masks and layers of conditioning leads to more honesty. When we are stripped of our defenses, we can offer our best. We become capable of intimacy and humanity.” ~Vangeline

This Butoh workshop creates a supportive environment to start an individual and collective process of investigation through creative movement. Participants start a spiritual and energetic journey to express, heal and transform hidden aspects of themselves. The work incorporates Japanese Butoh techniques, guided imagery, bio-energetics, core energetics, creative movement, improvisation, release techniques, elements of Noguchi gymnastics. This unique training is an invaluable tool for dancers, actors, adult beginners, encouraging participants to open up and expand physically and energetically.

*All levels and complete beginners are welcome.

***

Vangeline - "Downrise" photography by Michael Blase

Vangeline – “Downrise”
photography by Michael Blase

Featured Artist: Vangeline

After 15 sold out shows at the Avignon Festival in July 2014, Vangeline is delighted to perform her solo FIFTH OF BEETHOVEN-Admiring Tatsumi Hijikata” in Asheville.

Beethoven meets Butoh as Vangeline’s performance conjures up the ghosts of two passionate giants who left us with an immeasurable legacy.

Tatsumi Hijikata’s costume worn for his last public solo performance in 1968 (is inspiration for Vangeline’s costume created by New York designer Todd Thomas (Katie Perry Prismatic Tour).

***

[photography by Michael Blase

[photography by Michael Blase

“Fifth of Beethoven – Admiring Tatsumi Hijikata”

***

VANGELINE "STREETS"

VANGELINE “STREETS”

Vangeline is a teacher, dancer, and choreographer specializing in the Japanese postwar avant-garde movement form Butoh. She is the Artistic Director of the Vangeline Theater (NYC), a dance company firmly rooted in the tradition of Japanese Butoh while carrying it into the 21st century. She was born in Bourgogne, France and moved to New York in 1993.

Vangeline’s choreographic work spans performance on stage and in film and has been performed throughout the US for the past 10 years. Her work has been heralded in publications such as the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and LA Weekly to name a few. Time OUT Chicago named Vangeline’s, “one of the best Dance Visits of 2011.”

Since its inception in 2002, the Vangeline Theater has fused the post-apocalyptic vision of Butoh with the aesthetics of 21st century film noir. The Company’s unique style, which might be described as “butoh meets film noir,” is informed by Vangeline’s extensive training with Butoh Masters, including Tetsuro Fukuhara, Yoshito Ohno, Yumiko Yoshioka, Diego Pinon and Katsura Kan, as well as performing Butoh solo on stage and film.

Vangeline’s critically acclaimed choreographed works have been presented in New York at Joyce SoHo, White Wave, the New Museum, Dance Theater Workshop, PS122 Performance Space, and Abrons Arts Center. She was the recipient of a six-month artist residency at PS122 Performance Space (“New, New Stuff”); since 2006 she has received prestigious awards from the Puffin Foundation, the Japan Foundation, the New York Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Asian American Arts Alliance, Brooklyn Arts Council, and the Robert Friedman Foundation.

She is the founder of the 7-year running, award-winning program “The Dream a Dream Project”, which brings Butoh dance to incarcerated men and women at correctional facilities across New York City.

Also active in film and theatre, Vangeline performed the critically acclaimed role of the ghost of Elizabeth Short (the “Black Dahlia”) in the 2011 Los Angeles production of ‘The Chanteuse and the Devil’s Muse.’ directed by David J (Bauhaus). The Los Angeles press unanimously praised her Butoh performance. THEATER IN LA selected her performance as one of the best 2011 performances in Los Angeles.

Recent film projects include a starring role alongside actors James Franco and Winona Ryder in the feature film by director Jay Anania, ‘The Letter (2012-Lionsgate). Vangeline is currently in collaboration with the Marina Abromovic Institute and Neuroscientist Suzanne Dikker, exploring the intersection of Butoh and Neuroscience.

***

photography by Kosuke Mori

Artistic Director: Julie Becton Gillum

photography by Kosuke Mori

****
www.vangeline.com–
www.ashevillebutoh.com
www.vangeline.com
www.vimeo.com/vangeline
www.facebook.com/vangelinetheater
@vangelinebutoh on twitter

Butoh “POWERHOUSE” Vanessa Skantz Returns to Asheville for Workshop /Performance

Vanessa Skantz

Vanessa Skantz


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 17, 2014
Press Contact: Sara Baird
PH: (646) 522-2518
email: info@anemonedance.org

Asheville dance companies Anemone Dance Theater and Legacy Butoh will collaborate to host acclaimed Butoh artist and choreographer Vanessa Skantze for an artist residency in Asheville the week of August 5-12.

Highlights of the residency include:

“Listening to the Bones: The Body as Instrument and Offering”
a movement workshop and performance open to the public

When: Saturday, August 9, 2:00 – 5:00 pm
Where: Bebe Theater
20 Commerce Street
Asheville, NC 28801
Description: Creating a space of curiosity and trust while fostering intense physical/mental focus, the workshop will facilitate awareness of the concurrent structural and energetic alignment of the body; explore limits of flexibility and strength, speed and stillness, instability and ground; work in pairs to develop listening beyond the skin; and invoke imagery to be absorbed into the body–creating the offering of Butoh dance. Follow the workshop, a studio performance will feature workshop participants performing the newly created dance piece as well as Vanessa Skantze performing a solo set.

For more information or to register, email Sara Baird at info@anemonedance.org or call (646)522-2518. Suggested donation is $30.

“Radiant Poison”
During her residency, Vanessa Skantze will work with professional dancers to choreograph Radiant Poison, a dance that journeys through four gardens: origins, illusion, creation, and dissolution. Radiant Poison will premiere October 25 and 26 at Grove Park in Asheville as part of UWABE – Art in the Park, a free outdoor dance series funded in part by the Asheville Area Arts Council with support from Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center.

Vanessa Skantze, a Butoh artist and teacher of yoga and dance, has performed in the U.S. and Europe for more than 20 years and is now based in Seattle. She co-founded the New Orleans sound/movement ensemble Death Posture and collaborates with renowned musicians such as Jarboe and percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani. Skantze has trained and performed with Jinen Butoh founder Atsushi Takenouchi, has created numerous ensemble works and solo pieces under the name Danse Perdue, and taught as part of Lydia Lunch’s Post-Catastrophe Collaborative.

Anemone Dance Theater, under the artistic direction of Sara Baird, is influenced by the philosophy of Japanese Butoh Dance – a theatrical poetry of opposites, absurdities and unanticipated beauty. In addition to directing her own company, Baird has performed with the Butoh Rockettes directed by Celeste Hastings, Poppo & Gogo Boys, Richard Move for the Guggenheim Museum, VH1, and the Cannes Film Festival, and has toured the U.S., South America, and Europe. In 2007, Baird was chosen by master Akira Kasai to perform at The Japan Society in NYC for his commission, Butoh America.

Legacy Butoh was founded in 2005 by Julie Becton Gillum, an icon of the Asheville dance community who previously founded three modern dance companies. Gillum has been creating, performing, and teaching dance in the US, France, Cuba and Mexico for over 40 years. Since 1998, she has created and presented major Butoh pieces at a variety of venues in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Mexico, along with producing the annual Asheville Butoh Festival. In 2009, she was awarded the prestigious Choreography Fellowship by the North Carolina Arts Council, which enabled her to travel to Japan to study with Butoh masters.

Sara Baird, Artistic Director of Anemone Dance Theater, and Julie Becton Gillum, Artistic Director of Legacy Butoh, are frequent collaborators, having choreographed and performed together at the Asheville Fringe Festival, as part of NC Stage’s Catalyst Series, at Black Mountain College Museum + Art Center’s Re-Happening, and at many Asheville street festivals.

NICOLE LEGETTE, CHICAGO’S BUTOH “MAVERICK” RETURNS TO ASHEVILLE

WHAT: Butoh Dance Workshop with Nicole LeGette (No Experience Necessary)

WHEN: Friday April 25, 7:00 – 9:00 PM

WHERE: Bryson Gym, on the campus of Warren Wilson College at North entrance

COST: FREE to WWC students; Students with ID – $5; Adults and Seniors – $10-25 (sliding scale)

FOR INFORMATION: Email JULIE ; call /text 828 683 1377

photo of Nicole LeGette by Michelle Tupko

8th Asheville Butoh Festival WORKSHOP INFORMATION

Jenni Cockrell

*ALL WORKSHOPS WILL BE TAUGHT AT THE

BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street

This years festival will offer four exciting workshops for you to really get yourself satiated with the expressive art of butoh. Each workshop is designed for all levels of experience so spring into action and bring butoh into your body and life.

#1

WHEN: Friday April 26, 10 AM-1PM

TAUGHT BY: Maureen “momo” Freehill

#2

WHEN: Saturday April 27, 12 PM – 3 PM

TITLE: “One Drop”

TAUGHT BY: Keiko Hashimoto

DESCRIPTION: This class will explore the following questions:

How can we connect the unchanging and the ever-changing in our life?                            How can we bring one drop of life to the big river?

Through the human body, using exercises in space like walking, standing, levels, qualities of strength and delicacy, we will discover “space flower” or “stone back”. This workshop will connect to Friday’s workshop with momo, in that both these teachers’ primary mentor was butoh c0-founder Kazuo Ohno.


#3

WHEN: Sunday April 28, 12 – 3 PM

TAUGHT BY: Florence Poulain and Bob Lyness

TITLE: “Collective Consciousness at Play”

DESCRIPTION: In the tradition of butoh master Diego Pinon, this workshop will focus on exploring states of mind and attitudes, ranging from the subtle to the grotesque, through individual and interactive explorations. In this process of self-discovery we will connect with one another,  cultivating a supportive energetic exchange.

#4

TITLE: “Dance and the Archetypal Symbol: An Improvisational Butoh Workshop”

DESCRIPTION: This improvisational, Butoh inspired class will explore the question “How does the soul experience image and archetype?”  Through Butoh exercises and improvisation, we will delve into symbols and images, exploring them as vital seeds for dance, performance and the human experience.

TAUGHT BY: Jenni Cockrell

WHEN: Monday April 29, 6 – 9 PM


BUTOH DANCE PRACTICE IN ASHEVILLE

Come to our regular butoh practice led by Julie Becton Gillum and other practitioners of the form.

Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 11:30 AM,

Place: BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street, downtown Asheville

Cost: $5

For Info: jbgbutoh@gmail.com or 828 683-1377

ASHEVILLE BUTOH FESTIVAL WORKSHOPS

The Asheville Butoh Festival will host three exciting workshops by butoh artists: Vanessa Skantz of Danse Perdue from Seattle, Chicago dancer Nicole LeGette of Blushing Poppy Productions, and Monika Gross, a recent transplant to Asheville from NYC. Classes are open to all – no previous dance or butoh experience required. All workshops are $25 if registered before June 15; $30 on the day of the workshop.

“Deep Listening”

Ankoku Butoh Workshop with Vanessa Skantz

Saturday, June 16, 1 – 4 PM

BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street

"The Mona Lisa"Vanessa’s workshops are dedicated to creating a shared space of curiosity and trust while fostering intense physical/mental focus. The body in crisis of Butoh differs from a body that moves habitually. Its total existence is compelling. By witnessing  the simplest of movement:- crawling, rising, walking, falling-displays the naked immediacy of the natural world. Tree, stone, animal, water- embracing these energies re-connects the human body to the world beyond its skin and to the evolution of life within its own cells.

Workshop goals are:

- Communion with the breath

- Rigorous and rhythmic physical work, exploring limits of flexibility and strength, speed and stillness, lightness and weight, and the edge of balance

- Listening to the bones, understanding anatomical and energetic structure as one source

- Employing the instrument of the body with its spirals, waves, folds and twists

- Working with sound/voice to develop listening skills

- Honing “deep listening” skills through partner work involving direct touch, echoing, and the practice of being moved, being danced.

- Listening to the dance being born inside, seeking the unknown, allowing the world to be created anew at each moment

These elements are tools to create an empathetic bridge of our bodies. We strive for a dance in which we sacrifice our energy in recognition of the intense life that brought about who we are in this moment. To make this dance we must become, in the words of Antonin Artaud,” acrobats of the heart” as well as technicians of the physical body.

As these body practices are honed, we place imagery into the body to become other, and make the leap into transformation-a kind of willed possession in which the dancer viscerally draws other into his body.  How to find the raw feeling of the flower breaking through the earth, sucking at the sun, rather than the ideal?

Butoh Workshop by Nicole LeGette

Sunday June 17, 1 – 4 PM

BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street

Taxonomy of Transformation”

Transformation is one of the salient and radical aspects of butoh. The dance itself is found within the very act of transformation. Yet oftentimes, the detailed process of transmutation, this deliberate transit of the transition, is overlooked, not crafted. A certain indulgent sameness results, with focus on A and B rather than the space the lies between A-B.  In this workshop we will identify and investigate specific techniques that bring renewed attention to and encourage detailed crafting of the dance of transformation.


BUTOH WORKSHOP:
“The Continuity of Becoming” by Monika Gross,

Monday June 18, 6 – 9 PM

BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street

This workshop offers simple principles of the Alexander Technique as a way into the butoh dancer’s imaginative process of continuous conscious transformation:  A widened awareness of infinite Time and Space. An undivided perception of Self. Giving consent to being “danced.” Moving with curiosity and confidence from the Known into the Unknown. Falling upward. Rising downward. Slipping effortlessly into the Between Space of endless possibility.

Monika Gross is a Senior Teacher of the Alexander Technique, teaching sine 1985. She has a BFA in Drama from the NC School of the Arts and has trained in butoh over the past ten years with such teachers as Akira Kasai, Tadashi Endo, Yukio Waguri, and Atsushi Takenouchi.
www.FormFitnessFunction.com

Asheville Butoh Festival 2012

June 14 – 18
BeBe Theatre
20 Commerce Street
and other downtown
Asheville locations

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

FOUR BEBE THEATRE PERFORMANCES

TIME: 8:00 PM Thursday thru Sunday June 14 – 17

PLACE: 20 Commerce Street

COST: In Advance – $15 (general), $10 (Seniors, Students); At the Door – $17, $12

THREE WORKSHOPS WITH GUEST ARTISTS AT BEBE THEATRE

#1: Workshop with Vanessa Skantze

WHERE: Bebe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street

TIME: 1:00 – 4:00 PM Saturday June16

COST: $30; $25 (if registered by June 1)

#2: Workshop with Nicole LeGette

WHERE:BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street

TIME: 1:00 – 4:00 PM Sunday June 17

COST: $30; $25 (if registered by June 1)

#3: Workshop with Alex Ruhe

WHERE: BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street

TIME: 6:00 – 9:00 PM June 18

COST: $30; $25 (if registered by June 1)

FOUR FREE DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE STREET PERFORMANCES

# 1: “Excursus” performed by Anemone Dance Theatre & Legacy Butoh

WHERE: Pack Place Park

TIME: 6:00 PM Thursday June 14

# 2: Julie Becton Gillum

WHERE: Wall Street @ the staircase

TIME: 6:00 PM Friday June 15

#3: Valeria Watson-Doost

WHERECorner of Eagle and Market, in front of the YMI

TIME: 6:00 PM Saturday June 16

#4: Jenni Cockrell

WHERE: Pritchard Park

TIME: 6:00 PM Sunday June 17

PRESS RELEASE

Adventurous audiences are in for a treat! The ASHEVILLE BUTOH FESTIVAL, produced by the Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre and Legacy Butoh will bring provocative performances and engaging workshops by prominent American butoh artists from Chicago and Seattle as well as works by local professional dancers. Chicago-based artist Nicole LeGette (Blushing Poppy) as well as Vanessa Skantze and Alex Ruhe (Danse Perdue) in Seattle will be featured. Both companies are celebrating their 10th anniversaries this year. The BeBe Theatre at 20 Commerce Street will host performances at 8:00 PM Thursday through Sunday, June 14 – 18. Cost for these shows is $15 (in advance) for general audiences and $10 for Seniors and Students; at the door, tickets are $17 and $12 respectively.

ASHEVILLE BUTOH FESTIVAL will sponsor three exciting workshops by the guest artists at the BeBe Theatre. “Deep Listening” a Butoh workshop with Vanessa Skantze will be offered on Saturday June 16, 1:00 – 4:00 PM. On Sunday June 17, 1:00 – 4:00, Nicole LeGette will present “Taxonomy of Transformation.” Asheville Butoh Festival will conclude with Alex Ruhe‘s workshop on Monday 6:00 – 9:00 PM. Cost for each workshop is $30. There is a FULL festival package which includes all three workshops and 4 tickets to performances of your choice for $125. Four-ticket PERFORMANCE ONLY packages are available for $40. What a deal, live performance for $10 a show! It’s better than the movies.

Free performances featuring local dancers will take place on the streets of downtown Asheville at 6:00 PM each evening. “Excursus,” performed by Anemone Dance Theatre and Legacy Butoh will open the Asheville Butoh Festival at Pack Place Park. Julie Becton Gillum will perform on the staircase on Wall Street on Friday June 15. On Saturday an offering by Valeria Watson-Doost will take place at Eagle and Market Streets by the YMI. Jenni Cockrell will perform at Pritchard Park on Sunday June 17.

Nicole LeGette, a maverick of Chicago’s dance and performance art scene, is dedicated to performing, presenting, and teaching butoh. She created Blushing Poppy Productions to encompass these endeavors. Nicole has trained extensively with master butoh artists in Japan, Mexico, Canada,and the US including Yoshito Ohno, Natsu Nakajima, and Diego Pinon. She has received numerous grants from the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. As a solo performer, LeGette has presented work throughout the US, Mexico, Indonesia and Japan.

“I consider myself a body theorist and practitioner whose concern is with the dilemma we encounter as beings possessing both spirit and body. I seek to illuminate a culture more responsive to body consciousness and use dance as the most direct means to confront this personal/social/political rebellion.” Nicole LeGette

In 2002, Vanessa Skantze and Alex Ruhe founded Danse Perdue (lost dance) a performance arts company with projects rooted in the exploration of internal, physical, millennial and universal crises. Danse Perdue aesthetics incorporates classical arts and outlaw arts, drawing inspiration from mental and social illnesses as well as psychological and transgressive literature. Joy Von Spain, an accomplished vocalist and instrumentalist will accompany Dance Perdue in the Asheville Butoh Festival performances. Danse Perdue has toured their intimate collaborations between bodies and sound in the United States and Europe. Their work reflects uncertainty and inevitability; the ambiguities of nature, philosophy, and ethics. Vanessa and Alex have trained and performed extensively with Jinen Butoh founder Atsushi Takenouchi since 2003.
. . . to seek to become an empathetic bridge, to offer the body to this tremendous life force habitually not seen and not appreciated. To dance as one crow, one sibyl, one outcast, one disappeared creature is to vibrate one-to-one with each being who witnesses, to allow them a space to experience: I am this creature, this creature is me.” Vanessa Skantze
For tickets or information about the Asheville Butoh Festival, please check out our websites at http://www.acdt.org and http://www.ashevillebutoh.com or call 828 254 2621.

Sincerely,

Julie Becton Gillum
Founder, Legacy Butoh

April Fools Butoh Festival

Dear Friends,

This is to let you know about a very exciting upcoming event in the Asheville arts community. In light of recent disasters such as in Japan, Haiti, and Pakistan, a portion of the proceeds from this event will be donated to The Red Cross and Doctors without Borders. Hope you can participate.

Sincerely,
Julie Becton Gillum

Press Release for April Fools Butoh Festival

What? 3 BUTOH Performances

When? Friday & Saturday, April 1, 2, 2011 @ 7:30
Sunday April 3 @ 6:00 PM

Where? BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street, downtown Asheville

Who? Seattle Dancers: Sheri Brown, Maureen “momo” Freehill
Local Dancers: Julie B. Gillum, Sara Baird, Megan Ransmeier,
Lucas Baumann, Andrew Braddock, Melissa McKee, Jenni Cockrell

How Much? In Advance – $15 (general), $10 (Seniors, Students)
At the Door – $17, $12

***
What? 3 BUTOH Workshops

When /Who? Saturday April 2, 1:00-4:00, Julie Gillum (Asheville)
Sunday April 3, 1:00-4:00, Sheri Brown (Seattle)
Monday April 4, 6:00-9:00 -“momo” Freehill (Seattle)

Where? BeBe Theatre, New Studio Of Dance,
20 Commerce Street, downtown Asheville

How Much? $50 per single workshop
$90 for all 3 workshops (9 hours!)

Get ready for the “APRIL FOOLS BUTOH FESTIVAL” Produced by the Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre and Legacy Butoh, the festival will feature guest artists Sheri Brown and Maureen “momo” Freehill from the Seattle area as well as Asheville dancers in a smorgasbord of workshops and performances at the infamous BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street in downtown Asheville. Performances are Friday April 1 and Saturday April 2 at 7:30 PM with a Sunday April 3 show at 6:00 PM. For tickets or information, please check out our websites at http://www.acdt.org/ and http://www.ashevillebutoh.com/ or call 828 254 2621.
Butoh originated in post-WWII Japan as an artistic reaction to the chaotic climate in the country following the war and the uneasy shift towards democratic values. Butoh dance is a postmodern m movement in which formal dance technique is eschewed in favor of primal and idiosyncratic movements. Butoh was born from an amalgamation of influences including the German expressionistic dances of Mary Wigman and Harold Krautzberg, western writers such as Genet, Artaud and de Sade, and the artistic movements of Surrealism and Dada. Butoh uses the body brazenly, in its most corporeal state, as a battleground to attain personal, social, or political transformations. Butoh dance challenges convention and avoids definition in order to reveal the fervent beauty of the unique human spirit. The “APRIL FOOLS BUTOH FESTIVAL” gives the Asheville community a rare opportunity to see a broad spectrum butoh dance performed by seasoned professionals as well as emerging artists in the field.
Sheri Brown met butoh in 2000, after 11 years of theatre and street performance and never looked back. She has studied with butoh masters Katsura Kan, Diego Pinon, Akira Kasai, Natsu Nakajima, and Yoshito Ohno to name a few. Brown collaborates with artists from all disciplines and has received numerous grants and awards for her artistic work, both regionally in the NW and internationally. Brown serves as the Artistic & Programs Director of Seattle-based DAIPANbutoh (www.daipanbutoh.com), an organization dedicated to strengthening the presence of Butoh in the Northwest, through producing performances and workshops for and by local, regional and international artists. And when she has time she tours as a solo performer and teaches butoh workshops.
Brown will perform “Ainsi Soit-Il” (“Amen“) a solo incorporating aspects of mother, father, dreams, and the subconscious. “Ainsi Soit-Il” means “Amen” or “So be it” in French. “Rivers of Industry” is work-in-progress informed by butoh-fu (movement vocabulary) created by the Vangeline Theatre in NYC, recent travel to Bangkok, and collaborative fusion with Alan Sutherland from Seattle, and Asheville’s own Megan Ransmeier, “Rivers “ will be performed by Ransmeier and Andrew Braddock.
Performing Sunday only, Maureen “momo” Freehill, is Artistic Director of MomoButoh International Dance Company; based in Seattle area, with 30 years experience as performer, educator & director of body-based practice & performance. She holds an MFA from U of Hawaii & Certifications in Yoga, Hypnotherapy & Dance Therapy. Momo danced for 5 years with Kazuo and Yoshito Ohno in Japan. Momo will perform “Flower Child” about babies, bees and her New Haven child-hood memories of protests and socio-cultural experiments during the 60s and 70s. In addition, Freehill will be joined by Sheri Brown for a duet in Sunday’s performance ONLY.
For those of you who want to learn more about the delicious enigma that is BUTOH, there are three tasty workshops offered during “April Fools Butoh Festival.” On Saturday April 2, 1:00-4:00 PM, Julie B Gillum will offer material from her recent work in Japan with Seisaku, a Yoko Ashikawa disciple. Sheri Brown’s workshop, Sunday April 3, 1:00-4:00 PM will focus on searching for the eternal presence of pure force beyond the civilizations of Capitalism, Socialism, Westernization, and Modernization. On Monday April 4, 6:00-9:00 PM, Momo’s workshop incorporates Poetry, Visual Art, Music and Dance to evoke our soul’s deepest “Callings” toward an artful Life. All of these exciting workshops taught by professionals whose total combined years of experience falls just short of 100, can be had for the same price $90 . . . or $50 for a single workshop.

www.ashevillebutoh.com
www.acdt.org

http://momobutoh.net/

BUTOH DANCE WORKSHOP

What: Butoh Dance Workshop
When: Saturday, November 21, 1:00 – 4:00
Where: Bryson Gym, Warren Wilson College
Who: Taught by Julie Becton Gillum
Cost: $30.00
Contact: Julie Becton Gillum, email: jbgbutoh@gmail.com,
Telephone: (828)683-1377
“Create the form and the soul will follow.” Tatsumi Hijikata (founder of
butoh)
“Follow your heart and the form will reveal itself.” Kazuo Ohno (founder
of butoh)
Butoh History: Originating in post WWII Japan, Butoh dance is a postmodern movement in which
formal dance technique is eschewed in favor of primal and idiosyncratic styles that transform the human
body and allow raw physical energy to come into being. Butoh has revolutionized what dance is and can
be. It ‘s influence on today’s dance world equals that of Martha Graham or Merce Cunningham. Butoh is
an attempt to create new forms of movement and expression. Butoh uses the body brazenly, in its most
corporal state, as a battleground to attain personal, social, or political transformation. It searches for the
dance that pushes buttons, steps on toes and slips between the cracks of definition in order to reveal the
fervent beauty of the unique human spirit.
Biography of Julie Becton Gillum: Julie Gillum has been creating, performing and teaching dance in
the US and internationally for over 40 years. She currently teaches modern dance, musical theatre,
performance art and butoh at Warren Wilson College. Gillum’s primary form of artistic expression has
become butoh, which she has been practicing, performing and teaching since 1997. She has created and
presented major pieces in the genre, at a variety of venues in New York, Chicago, San Francisco
and Mexico. Gillum was awarded the 2008-09 NC Choreography Fellowship and used the funds to go
to Japan this past summer to study butoh at the source.
During her three month stay in Japan, Gillum studied primarily with Yoshito Ohno, son of Kazuo Ohno.
She also studied extensively with Natsu Nakajima, a disciple of Hijikata during the early days of butoh.
In addition she took weekly classes with Seisaku, who danced with Yoko Ashikawa, Hijikata’s first
female dancer. Gillum also took intensive workshops and performed with internationally renowned
butoh companies, Dairakudakan and Sankai Juku. The November workshop will delve into new material
learned in Japan this past summer.What: Butoh Dance Workshop
When: Saturday, November 21, 1:00 – 4:00
Where: Bryson Gym, Warren Wilson College
Who: Taught by Julie Becton Gillum
Cost: $30.00
Contact: Julie Becton Gillum, email: jbgbutoh@gmail.com,
Telephone: (828)683-1377
“Create the form and the soul will follow.” Tatsumi Hijikata (founder of
butoh)
“Follow your heart and the form will reveal itself.” Kazuo Ohno (founder
of butoh)
Butoh History: Originating in post WWII Japan, Butoh dance is a postmodern movement in which
formal dance technique is eschewed in favor of primal and idiosyncratic styles that transform the human
body and allow raw physical energy to come into being. Butoh has revolutionized what dance is and can
be. It ‘s influence on today’s dance world equals that of Martha Graham or Merce Cunningham. Butoh is
an attempt to create new forms of movement and expression. Butoh uses the body brazenly, in its most
corporal state, as a battleground to attain personal, social, or political transformation. It searches for the
dance that pushes buttons, steps on toes and slips between the cracks of definition in order to reveal the
fervent beauty of the unique human spirit.
Biography of Julie Becton Gillum: Julie Gillum has been creating, performing and teaching dance in
the US and internationally for over 40 years. She currently teaches modern dance, musical theatre,
performance art and butoh at Warren Wilson College. Gillum’s primary form of artistic expression has
become butoh, which she has been practicing, performing and teaching since 1997. She has created and
presented major pieces in the genre, at a variety of venues in New York, Chicago, San Francisco
and Mexico. Gillum was awarded the 2008-09 NC Choreography Fellowship and used the funds to go
to Japan this past summer to study butoh at the source.
During her three month stay in Japan, Gillum studied primarily with Yoshito Ohno, son of Kazuo Ohno.
She also studied extensively with Natsu Nakajima, a disciple of Hijikata during the early days of butoh.
In addition she took weekly classes with Seisaku, who danced with Yoko Ashikawa, Hijikata’s first
female dancer. Gillum also took intensive workshops and performed with internationally renowned
butoh companies, Dairakudakan and Sankai Juku. The November workshop will delve into new material

learned in Japan this past summer.

Here is the info about my upcoming workshop. Please let your friends know about this opportunity and feel free to contact me with any questions you have. Hope you can come!

What: Butoh Dance Workshop

When: Saturday, November 21, 1:00 – 4:00

Where: Bryson Gym, Warren Wilson College

Who: Taught by Julie Becton Gillum

Cost: $30.00 (FREE FOR WWC STUDENTS)

Contact: Julie Becton Gillum, email: jbgbutoh@gmail.com,

Telephone: (828)683-1377

“Create the form and the soul will follow.” Tatsumi Hijikata (founder of butoh)

“Follow your heart and the form will reveal itself.” Kazuo Ohno (founder of butoh)

Butoh History: Originating in post WWII Japan, Butoh dance is a postmodern movement in which formal dance technique is eschewed in favor of primal and idiosyncratic styles that transform the human body and allow raw physical energy to come into being. Butoh has revolutionized what dance is and can be. It ‘s influence on today’s dance world equals that of Martha Graham or Merce Cunningham. Butoh is an attempt to create new forms of movement and expression. Butoh uses the body brazenly, in its most corporal state, as a battleground to attain personal, social, or political transformation. It searches for the dance that pushes buttons, steps on toes and slips between the cracks of definition in order to reveal the fervent beauty of the unique human spirit.

Biography of Julie Becton Gillum: Julie Gillum has been creating, performing and teaching dance in the US and internationally for over 40 years. She currently teaches modern dance, musical theatre, performance art and butoh at Warren Wilson College. Gillum’s primary form of artistic expression has become butoh, which she has been practicing, performing and teaching since 1997. She has created and presented major pieces in the genre, at a variety of venues in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Mexico. Gillum was awarded the 2008-09 NC Choreography Fellowship and used the funds to go to Japan this past summer to study butoh at the source.

During her three month stay in Japan, Gillum studied primarily with Yoshito Ohno, son of Kazuo Ohno. She also studied extensively with Natsu Nakajima, a disciple of Hijikata during the early days of butoh. In addition she took weekly classes with Seisaku, who danced with Yoko Ashikawa, Hijikata’s first female dancer. Gillum also took intensive workshops and performed with internationally renowned butoh companies, Dairakudakan and Sankai Juku. The November workshop will delve into new material she learned in Japan this past summer.

Workshops and Classes

So far I have taken most of my classes with Yoshito Ohno and Natsu Nakajima. By meeting people in these workshops, I have found out about other classes and performances around Tokyo.  Even though I get most of my information via translations from bilingual students, I feel I am gaining some valuable information that I can work on for years. But I am sure much is lost because of the language barrier.

I took class with a Sankai Juku dancer that seemed like Martha Graham gone butoh; I probably will not go back to that one. But I did take a class with Seisaku, who studied with Yukio Waguri and is an excellent teacher.  His work is based on emptiness in the body, not images, and a new way of defining space. The first half of the class is a thorough physical warm-up conducted by Yuri, a modern /ballet trained dancer who has been drawn to butoh.

Natsu’s classes start with Noguchi Seitai, exercizes using massage, breathing techniques, and physical training. In her creative work she encourages use of dance elements (space, time and energy) as well as blending abstract dance movement with theatre actions.  She claims that Hijikata believed that butoh was pure theatre.

Yoshito’s classes involve no warm-up, so I have to arrive early to get these old bones moving. His style is warm, generous, and encouraging filled with imagistic suggestions which are quite poetic and inspiring. He often quotes and imitates both Hijikata and Kazuo and modestly refers to himself as shadow or frame. Though in his 70′s, he is still a vibrant force, touring the world, performing and teaching.

After all classes there is social time. Yoshito always serves tea or wine and snacks. Often everyone goes out for drinks and delicious Japanese food served family style. I love this country, its customs, and most of all its people!